Melissa Mackey on How to Identify and Fill Holes in Your Content that Limit Your Traffic

In this video interview, Internet marketing expert Melissa Mackey discusses how to discover gaps in website content that causes bounced visitors, or even fewer people coming to your site at all. She explains how to fill the 'holes.'

A hole in your content would be something you offer, says Mackey, but that your website doesn't address and people can't find.

One way to find these holes is by using Pay Per Click (PPC) to find what people are actually searching for, in terms of keywords and keyphrases. Additionally, if you find they people are coming to your site but not converting, that's a hole, too.

The first step is keyword research using a tool like the Google AdWords Keyword Tool or Google Insights for Search. This may show you keywords that don't appear on your site or that are not optimized for on your webpages — a gap in your content.

The second step is to track what people do when they come to your site. If they don't convert or bounce (use their back key to return to where they came from), this is also an indication that your content is lacking.

Step 3 is to provide content. Write some new copy, replacing jargon terms with consumer-oriented language. Your copy should reflect the language that you found was used in the keywords and phrases during your keyword research.

You might need to find additional content that you've created previously, such as a brochure or sales material you've used offline.

Another key is to make sure that the title of each page accurately reflects its contents.

When you study customer's preferred wording and understand why they aren't converting, you can turn around your online sales.

Melissa Mackey is the Online Marketing Manager for Fluency Media, a full-service digital agency based in Ann Arbor, Michigan, offering Pay Per Click, SEO, social media, website development, and e-mail marketing. This interview was recorded at the Search Engine Strategies Conference in Chicago in October 2010.

Melissa Mackey on How to Identify and Fill Holes in Your Content that Limit Your Traffic

In this video interview, Internet marketing expert Melissa Mackey discusses how to discover gaps in website content that causes bounced visitors, or even fewer people coming to your site at all. She explains how to fill the 'holes.'

A hole in your content would be something you offer, says Mackey, but that your website doesn't address and people can't find.

One way to find these holes is by using Pay Per Click (PPC) to find what people are actually searching for, in terms of keywords and keyphrases. Additionally, if you find they people are coming to your site but not converting, that's a hole, too.

The first step is keyword research using a tool like the Google AdWords Keyword Tool or Google Insights for Search. This may show you keywords that don't appear on your site or that are not optimized for on your webpages -- a gap in your content.

The second step is to track what people do when they come to your site. If they don't convert or bounce (use their back key to return to where they came from), this is also an indication that your content is lacking.

Step 3 is to provide content. Write some new copy, replacing jargon terms with consumer-oriented language. Your copy should reflect the language that you found was used in the keywords and phrases during your keyword research.

You might need to find additional content that you've created previously, such as a brochure or sales material you've used offline.

Another key is to make sure that the title of each page accurately reflects its contents.

When you study customer's preferred wording and understand why they aren't converting, you can turn around your online sales.

Melissa Mackey is the Online Marketing Manager for Fluency Media, a full-service digital agency based in Ann Arbor, Michigan, offering Pay Per Click, SEO, social media, website development, and e-mail marketing. This interview was recorded at the Search Engine Strategies Conference in Chicago in October 2010.

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